A Magazine by the Society of Professional Journalists


#diversity


June 14th, 2018 • Featured
Media must do better with race reporting

“May you live in interesting times …” The quote has been attributed to various sources, and rightfully so, being that it has been used by many to describe different time periods. Along with its true author, the original meaning of this quote has been lost to time, but can aptly describe today’s media climate.


April 11th, 2018 • Diversity
A primer for journalists covering sexual assault 

“It was 40 years ago.” “Take Joseph and Mary. Mary was a teenager and Joseph was an adult carpenter. They became parents of Jesus.” “There’s nothing wrong with a 30-year-old single male asking a 19-year-old, a 17-year-old, or a 16-year-old out on a date.” These are quotes from public officials defending Roy Moore, Republican Senate candidate in Alabama.


March 19th, 2018 • Featured
How newsroom culture is being re-evaluated following #MeToo

After The New York Times and The New Yorker’s groundbreaking exposés of disgraced Hollywood mogul and serial sexual abuser Harvey Weinstein, it wasn’t long before women in journalism began raising their hands to say, “Me too.” Powerful media figures such as MSNBC’s Mark Halperin, NPR’s Michael Oreskes and Leon Wieseltier, a former editor at The New Republic, were ousted from their jobs after women propelled by the “Weinstein effect” came forward with incriminating allegations of sexual harassment and assault.


February 26th, 2018 • Net Worked
Championing women every day

Next Thursday, International Women’s Day is observed – the day where women’s contributions to society, including in journalism, are celebrated. Much of the conversation has been on the role of women in journalism in light of the #MeToo movement on social media and the sexual harassment allegations against prominent male media figures, including Mark Halperin, Charlie Rose, Michael Oreskes, Garrison Keillor, Harvey Weinstein, and most recently, Tom Ashbrook.


February 21st, 2018 • Global Journalism
Freelance Journalists: Team Up!

I grew up without a tv at home. Instead, I read newspapers and I created scrapbooks full of articles. My interests were broad: royal families, wars, and American elections. The scrapbooks piled up, barely being touched because there was always new news. Ever since I was young, I wanted to be a foreign correspondent.


December 20th, 2017 • Net Worked
Raney Aronson-Rath on transparency

One of the biggest questions that journalism has faced over the course of the past year is how to maintain trust, in an era where the criticism “fake news” has become a norm. It is a conversation that is likely to continue over the course of the next year, as journalists and news organizations try to maintain trust with audiences.


November 2nd, 2017 • From the President
It’s time for SPJ to go public

“Seek truth and report it.” What a challenge those five words have proved to be. Figures in government at all levels are making it harder to find, let alone report, the truth. And elected officials have found it easy to scream “Fake news!” at coverage that clashes with their social and political beliefs.


November 2nd, 2017 • Quill Archives
Students and live news: Tips to avoiding kryptonite

Social media has changed not only the face of journalism. It has changed the entire standard for what is news and, in particular, what is considered “breaking news.” With a 24-hour news hole to fill, 365 days a year, even professional reporters have been tripped up while trying to beat the next 24-hour news cycler to the punch.


June 14th, 2017 • Quill Archives
Documentary Short Filmmaking For J-Students

When the Center for Media & Social Impact asked Sundance filmmaker Laura Poitras if she was a filmmaker, a journalist or both, she responded, “It’s journalism plus.” The director of the Edward Snowden documentary “Citizenfour” is a self-professed visual journalist. In an ever-changing media landscape, introducing journalism students to the basics of documentary filmmaking can be a rewarding and beneficial process.


April 13th, 2017 • Featured
Biased Truth: Nothing is Neutral

Everyone has a story. When I became a journalist, I put much of my story behind me: I had come out as transgender in 2000, at age 16. I had worked as a baker, a barista, a busker and a sex-toy salesperson.


April 13th, 2017 • Featured
Time to Abandon the Aversion to Immersion Journalism?

The email came in shortly after 1 a.m. on a Tuesday during spring break. “Dr. Cox,” it read, “I have a couple questions.” It was the first semester of my new experimental class, “Participatory Journalism,” and we were facing our first real ethics test.


February 22nd, 2017 • Quill Archives, Ten With...
Ten with Tara Gatewood

Nothing in Tara Gatewood’s career went according to plan. If it had, she says, she would be a photographer somewhere doing “amazing shoots.” Her interest in journalism — and course of study — started with photography at Montgomery College in Maryland, having moved from her home in the Isleta Pueblo tribal community in New Mexico.